TERRORISM IN THE VEDIC AGE

 

TERRORISM IN THE VEDIC AGE

Terrorism is not new nor is it unique to India. Their ideology is to support their activity of acquiring wealth and power through fear and violence. They have no productive activities, Their economy is based on plunder. These were called Asuras in Vedic times, and had to be dealt with by Dharmic kings like Sri Rama and Janamejaya. There is no soft approach to fighting terrorism, it needs to be destroyed root and branch.

Navaratna Rajaram

 

Background: Terrorism is not new

Terrorism is probably as old as human existence. When agricultural revolution began in India and East Asia, five or six thousand years ago, it became possible for hard working people to accumulate wealth by growing food crops and its supporting activity of animal husbandry producing milk meat and poultry products. This required productive hard work and care of domesticated animals like horses and cattle livestock. It is no accident that a person’s wealth was measured in terms of the size of his livestock possession, as is still the case with some pastoral tribes in Africa like the Masai.

Simultaneously with this new way of wealth production, there arose another group who envied their prosperity and wanted share of their wealth but not prepared to go through the rigors of hard work involved in creating wealth through hard work, either by inclination or ignorance of the needed skills. So they resorted to the use of force. During the transition from hunting and gathering to sedentary societies that arose from agriculture there existed men and women who had mastered hunting skills and use of weapons and found it easy to use them to terrorize the peaceful people for extorting what they had produced. These were called Asuras. People attached to peace and harmony were often referred to as Suras. Inevitably Asuras were their enemies and tormentors.

As agriculture expanded, large communities called villages, towns and cities came into existence. These expanded into kingdoms with several cities and towns. They needed warriors to protect them. These were called Kshatriyas. They needed people to educate them and their children and such people were called Brahmanas. But wealth was created by large scale agriculturists and traders who were called shudras and vaishyas. The kshtriyas commanded authority and respect because of their power and their willingness to risk their lives to defend the society.

 

In this age of specialization and super-specialization, , Dr. Navaratna Rajaram (aka Dr.N.S. Rajaram) remains a rare figure. His has worked in a wide     range of subjects from engineering and mathematical physics to Vedic history having made significant contributions in several of them. His last position was as professor of history and philosophy of science at the University of Massachusetts in the U.S.A.

 

 

 

 

 

As agriculture expanded, large communities called villages, towns and cities came into existence. These expanded into kingdoms with several cities and towns. They needed warriors to protect them. These were called Kshatriyas. They needed people to educate them and their children and such people were called Brahmanas. But wealth was created by large scale agriculturists and traders who were called shudras and vaishyas. The kshtriyas commanded authority and respect because of their power and their willingness to risk their lives to defend society. As society grew more complex, other crafts and sciences became necessary. Brahmanas who were the leaders in thinking, took the responsibility for creating new knowledge to improve life, while the Vaishyas and the Shudras put them into practice. In this as well as in the field of warfare many Bhahmanas also excelled in knowledge of weapons and warfare and became highly sought of as teachers by princes and other warriors. This gave rise to military science in which there were many Brahmana (or Brahmin) teachers. Among the most renowned were and Dronacharya in the Dwapara yuga or the Yuga of Sri Krishna and the Mahabharata War, and Parahurama, son of sage Jamadagni before him.